Posts Tagged resume

Talent Topic Compilation 2013 Edition

It’s that time again to bid farewell to another year. Before we race in to the new year, here’s a rear view look at 25 of the talent topics touched upon in 2013. Please feel free to provide feedback and share your favorites with those in your network who might benefit. Wishing everyone a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

2013

2013

Wishing all good luck in the new year – praying mantis — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/may-2013-bring-mantis-like-mindfulness/

 Some of the worst job search advice EVER — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/follow-this-advice-to-knock-yourself-out-of-consideration-for-a-job/

Hidden reality of hidden jobs — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/are-the-jobs-hiding-from-you/

Job searching can be a crappy process, don’t make it worse — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/18/how-to-instantly-put-your-job-search-in-the-crapper/

Not all diversity looks like demographic diversity – http://www.ere.net/2013/01/22/talent-diversity-isnt-just-about-demographic-data/

Greatest job seeker gripes (about recruiters) — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/follow-up-flubs-fiascoes-and-failures-that-frustrate-candidates

Learning how stuff works is YOUR job — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/does-this-thing-come-with-an-instruction-manual

Not all unlucky numbers are bad — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/pondering-significance-circumstance-3-13-13/

Can you train a monkey to do your job?

http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/recap-of-this-week-s-rbc-lessons-don-t-monkey-around-with-lies

Maybe it’s April Fool’s Day everyday for job candidates — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/fooling-around-with-candidates-everyday

Who decided that 80% of jobs are not posted? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/who-is-hiding-all-of-the-jobs

What happens when clueless people become recruiters? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/sucky-slacker-sourcing-strategies

Companies say they want to hire for certain traits, yet end up selecting something else —  http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/hypocrisy-in-hiring

Overly restrictive job requirements — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/is-there-any-responsibility-to-educate-or-enlighten-your-hiring

Recruiters that are crazy, lazy, or both — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/these-recruiters-must-be-crazy-to-be-so-lazy

Job search version of 20 questions — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/08/02/20-questions-for-your-job-search/

Age old issue of old age (and discrimination) — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/admit-it-the-big-o-stimulates-quite-a-reaction

Shedding light on the stigma of job hopping — http://wthomsonjr.com/guest-blog–kelly-blokdijk/maybe-you-should-withhold-that-job-hopper-judgment/

#1 reason for resume rejection — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/08/07/20-questions-for-your-job-search-2/

Opposite of good employer branding — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/how-to-cement-your-reputation-as-a-dorkola-recruiter

No need to settle for terrible HR — http://www.tlnt.com/2013/09/04/why-do-we-settle-for-low-information-human-resources/

Is it necessary information or an interview question? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/are-you-sure-you-need-the-answer-to-that-question

We all know what they say about assumptions — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/stop-showing-candidates-your-a-s-s-umptions

Everyone believes they know how to pick the best person for the job

http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/the-best-person-for-the-job

Caring enough to cook up creative content — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/refried-beans-and-recruiting-blogs

 Talent Topic Compilation Edition 2013 Articles by Kelly Blokdijk http://linkedin.com/in/kellyblokdijkattalenttalks

Kelly Blokdijk on Twitter @TalentTalks

Publication sources include:

TalentTalks Talent Optimization Blog https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/

Recruiting Blogs Dot Com http://recruitingblogs.com

TLNT Dot Com http://tlnt.com

Electronic Recruiting Exchange – ERE Dot Net http://www.ere.net

Bulls Eye Recruiting via http://wthomsonjr.com/

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Reason #1 for resume rejection

When interacting with people looking for jobs over the years, frustration with the entire process always comes up in the conversation. Usually, those getting zero to minimal response rate on their job applications are understandably the most irritated. Some seem mystified and oblivious to potential causes and others automatically assume they know exactly why they aren’t getting called.

While there are always multiple factors in play, one of the most obvious culprits of lack of positive attention is a flawed resume. Despite numerous reports suggesting resumes are dead, they still tend to be almost universally required as a first step in applying for a job across the majority of the business world.

Rejected Image Credit

I’ve often stated that approximately 95% of the resumes I’ve seen could benefit from some form of improvement. Perhaps that figure sounds extreme, but the reason it is so high is that I truly believe (as do many others) that a resume is intended to serve as the best possible first impression a person can make to a prospective employer.

Some people have told me that my standards are too harsh and that it is unfair to judge someone’s entire career from a single document. That opinion may seem reasonable on the surface, but delve into what it represents from a business standpoint to see if it holds true. Let’s consider that a person applying for a professional level job is expected to demonstrate the following in order to be eligible for an interview:

  • Ability to communicate professionally both verbally and in writing with one’s target audience
  • Attention to detail and concern for quality in work-related physical documents or electronic content
  • Comprehension of proper word usage, verb tense, grammar, spelling, punctuation and formatting when producing business-oriented correspondence

The above is an extremely limited list and doesn’t even get into actual hard skills, technical abilities and specific job related experience, training and education. Unfortunately, if lacking, the components listed are precisely the items that will undermine otherwise qualified candidates’ ability to convey their competence in their field.

The reality is, even if not explicitly expressed in the above manner, most occupations require a person to have a reasonable grasp of basic communication skills. If there is any doubt created in a person’s best first impression introduction message such as their resume, cover letter or even online profile, they will miss more opportunities than they will ever know.

Stubborn job seekers prefer to make assumptions about all sorts of possible reasons they aren’t getting any calls. Of course, in some rare cases, there could be some room for blame beyond a badly constructed resume.

But many people just prefer making excuses and speculating about how evil applicant tracking systems, discriminatory HR representatives and biased recruiters are at fault and show no willingness to hold themselves accountable for presenting a positive image. Instead of taking an objective view at how it is perceived when they fail to submit something worthy of being considered for their target job, these job seekers are the primary source of their own aggravation.

Article by Kelly Blokdijk – As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies and compelling, customized communication materials to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net 

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20 questions for your job search

The following are some of the most common “tips” or topics seen in the job search advice arena. Which do you believe are true or false and why?

warning sign

True or False Statements:

1)      No one will hire you if any of your Facebook photos contain alcohol

2)      Since it’s practically required to have your photo on LinkedIn, you should also include one on your resume

3)      Hiring companies always prefer candidates that have a blog

4)      You will differentiate yourself by submitting a video resume

5)      Cover letters are never read and won’t do you any good

6)      Handwritten post-interview thank-you notes help you become a top candidate

7)      Being active on social media proves you have advanced technology skills

8)      Your “digital footprint” (ultra stupid term) is more valuable than your resume

9)      If you have inconsistent work history, you must use a functional resume

10)   Hiring managers will be impressed with your infographic resume

11)   You need to build and maintain a consistent brand across all of your social media profiles

12)   You should share industry articles with hiring managers after your interviews

13)   If you don’t get a response after applying online you should call the company to speak with the hiring manager

14)   Candidate with highest Klout score should always be top choice

15)   If you get laid off, you should put “looking for new XYZ position” on your LinkedIn headline

16)   Job seekers 40+ years old never get interviewed because hiring companies discriminate

17)   You should do a lot of research before your interview so you can tell the company how you will fix their problems

18)   Contacting a lot of recruiters will help you get hired faster

19)   It makes sense to apply for jobs when you meet 50% of listed criteria

20)   Always circumvent HR because they never want anyone qualified to get hired

Answers:

1)      False – though there’s no need to leave your privacy settings wide-open if you fear your happy hour happenings might be mis-judged

2)      False – keep your resume focused on your career qualifications unless your appearance is pertinent to the type of work you do (modeling, acting)

3)      False – most people involved in hiring aren’t spending their spare time scouring the Internet to find new blogs – caveat: unless blogging is what you are employed to do

4)      False – don’t expect people to click the link, wait for the video to load/play and then watch your show – caveat: unless visual presentation/public speaking matters in your occupation

5)      False – not everyone cares about cover letters, but unless you know your recipient’s preference best of take advantage of the opportunity to communicate additional information

6)      False – while not entirely unheard of, whether typed or handwritten thank-you notes rarely influence opinions enough to make a difference in being added to the short list

7)      False – considering you are amidst billions of other people on the planet also active on social media, don’t expect special attention

8)      False – it might be concerning if there is no sign of you whatsoever online, but the vast majority of employers still rely heavily on traditional resumes to evaluate prospective hires

9)      False – if your employment history is in such a state that a functional resume seems necessary, you most likely need to apply for jobs where a resume isn’t required at all

10)   False – unless you are pursuing work where your graphic creativity is pertinent, at best a hiring manager might think your document is cute

11)   False – whether personal or professional, all you really need to keep in mind is: what goes on the Internet stays on the Internet

12)   False – aside from sending something that was requested, don’t add any uninvited extra mail (spam) to anyone’s inbox

13)   False – be patient and keep in mind most companies have a “don’t call us, we’ll call you” screening process and your extra eager attitude might get you noticed for the wrong reasons

14)   False – with limited exceptions, your Klout, Kred, EA, follower count or any other measurement score might be interesting, but rarely connected to hiring decisions

15)   False – your LinkedIn headline space should be maximized to express what others – your target audience – need to know about you professionally

16)   False – some claims of discrimination are valid, yet practically all employers desire the most qualified person for the position to be hired regardless of demographic attributes

17)   False – you should research available information in order to be prepared and informed, though it might be presumptuous to suggest you know how to fix internal problems

18)   False – companies hire based on qualifications, recruiters may facilitate portions of the process, but their loyalty is to the company/client not candidates

19)   False – at a minimum, you should strive to meet at least 90% of the required experience and background criteria being sought

20)   False – it is in HR’s interest to serve the company’s interest in attracting and selecting the best qualified person for each open position

Many of these topics or statements may produce an “it depends” reaction and the example answers are not intended to be a full explanation of every possible situation where certain actions may or may not make sense.

What do you agree or disagree with on the above list?  

Article by Kelly Blokdijk – As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies and compelling, customized communication materials to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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Pondering Significance & Circumstance 3-13-13

Most people in my personal and professional life are familiar with my HR background and how I’ve had a varied and diverse set of experiences both before and while working in that occupation. Another aspect many are aware of is how I’ve leveraged my traditional work in the “employment arena” to engage in some independent/freelance projects along the way.

A few of the primary activities I’ve been known for have been resume writing, job search coaching and career management consulting. Initially, I never set out to pursue that path, but over time it sort of took on a life of its own. Generally I viewed that as another branch of my own professional development with an added beneficial side-effect of using my knowledge to help others in their careers.

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When my HR management position was eliminated March 13, 2009 (Friday the 13th), I took advantage of the opportunity to assess MY overall career situation. Doing that myself was a form of practicing what I preached.

At the moment of my layoff I was literally one course away from completing my masters degree – one of my proudest accomplishments. As many of my classmates would attest, it was a grueling process to pursue an advanced degree while consistently balancing the demands of a 50-60 hour work week. Combining that level of burnout with the prospect of the emotional exhaustion that typically accompanies a job search in a decent economy WAS my dilemma. By then we were in the midst of the HELLACIOUS “great” recession – essentially the worst job market so far in my working life – I felt the time was right to explore “now what?”

Therefore, I reflected and contemplated whether I could transform KMB Resume Writing & Career Services, my part-time independent practice that I fit in when possible concurrently with corporate HR / talent management roles into a viable standalone “day job.” My analysis included coming up with the following list of the type of assistance I had been providing during the prior 12+ years.

– Accelerated job search progress for professionals across a wide-range of industries via high-quality presentation and consistent reinforcement of qualifications through “positive first impression” career marketing materials and corresponding messaging.

– Organically established 100% referral-based clientele through word-of-mouth, relationship-building and reputation for low-pressure, inquisitive and consultative style, paired with distinct value-added support based on recruiting industry insight and employer / hiring decision makers’ perspective.

– Customized and authored creatively designed and compellingly written resumes, bios and online profiles to position and prepare business professionals for their next opportunity.

– Delivered individualized job search strategy, defined action plans and developed tailored approach based on each professional’s specific circumstances and target positions.

– Coached and guided individuals through job market research, personal competency assessment, interview preparation, offer negotiation and LinkedIn lessons.

– Helped professionals differentiate themselves from the competition through identification, definition and focusing of their unique value proposition.

– Conducted interview practice and feedback sessions to fine tune presentation on paper, online and in person.

– Advised senior executives on nuances of conducting discreet, confidential job searches and navigating complexities related to search firms, leveraging professional networking contacts and related correspondence.

– Facilitated outplacement style group workshops and one-on-one counseling for displaced workers, career advancement seekers and those pursuing individual professional development.

I’m not a superstitious person, so I don’t think 13 is any luckier or unluckier than any other number. No matter what day it is, and no matter what obstacles show up, I feel fortunate and blessed to be surrounded by supportive people in my life. TalentTalks came about partially through unintentional preparation before 3-13-09, along with a heck of a lot of hard work over the four years leading up to 3-13-13.

Between my regular duties in HR and assorted side projects, I seem compelled to serve as an advisor to help individuals or organizations optimize their talent. Along with that I feel a responsibility to advocate on behalf of those not being seen, heard or noticed for their talent. The phrase “creating a voice for talent” is how I define that philosophy. Regardless of any future career developments that may occur, I will always value the incredibly unique learning opportunities I’ve experienced and the extraordinary encouragement I’ve encountered from those around me.

Article by Kelly Blokdijk – As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies and compelling, customized communication materials to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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How to Instantly Put Your Job Search in the Crapper

Some consider a resume and/or cover letter the most important professional documents to represent a person’s overall level of competence and credibility when pursuing employment opportunities. In fact for most US employers resumes/cover letters are the standard preliminary evaluation tools.

Therefore, I’m constantly astonished that so many people routinely submit error-ridden correspondence when the stakes are so high. Having to sort through stacks of lousy resumes is one of the most common recruiter complaints. The high-volume of applications and applicant tracking system black-hole syndrome does factor in to response rate, but doesn’t deserve anywhere the amount of blame as bad resumes. 

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Perhaps it seems unfair that people are being assessed by how they appear on paper (or on a screen), but that is why they say you only have one chance to make a great first impression. Some of the same sloppiness found on resumes and cover letters can be spotted on LinkedIn profiles as well. It puzzles me that so many career marketing messages reflect a lax attitude about attention to detail and obvious willingness to overlook easily preventable mistakes.

Effective and accurate communication skills tends to be one of the most universally expected qualifications across all types and levels of jobs. I realize that there are situations where that may not be the primary focus of a person’s job. However, those tend to be in categories where resumes and cover letters are not expected and applicants simply complete employment applications instead. Either way, it is still preferable regardless of document type, to receive content minus glaring errors such as typos, misspelled words, poor grammar, incorrect word usage, inconsistent formatting, unattractive fonts and so on…

No one expects the average person to be an expert profile, resume or cover letter writer, but most people in the hiring process do expect basic demonstration of written communication proficiency. Even if those fundamental literacy and quality assurance aspects are not critical for the initial position in question, I have seen plenty of people passed over for promotions and career advancement due to communication challenges. 

Anyone applying for jobs and not getting responses really should take an objective look at how their information is coming across to prospective employers. Make sure you are not flushing your reputation down the toilet by distributing information that makes the reader say: “this stinks!”

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies and compelling, customized communication materials to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

 

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Does your resume overwhelm your networking connections with TMI?

Often when a person embarks on a new job search, one of the first activities they do is update their resume and start passing it out to anyone and everyone they’ve ever met. While that might sound like a fine way to get things moving quickly, it tends to send the wrong message and ends up being a complicated, confusing and burdensome set of data for other people to process in their attempt to offer assistance.

 

Much of the content typically included on a traditional resume used to apply for jobs, could potentially distract a professional or personal networking contact from truly understanding the core job search elements that a job seeker needs to share.  It’s simply too much information (TMI)!

 

Most likely, the other person will not be in a position to have the proper context of the job seeker’s professional history, capabilities and differentiating factors, in relation to the current employment market or their desired career goals. Using a “networking resume” is one way to eliminate that issue.

 

A networking resume’s purpose is to provide a high-level overview of the key competencies and value added contributions a person delivers within their occupation. It may also cover education level, professional credentials obtained and prior employers, without the specific details of dates or titles… just enough to give readers an idea of what they’ve achieved.

 

Another feature of a networking resume is a section to highlight examples of target companies and / or the type of industry focus a person may have for their future role. Keeping the entire “story” to one page is an excellent way to help others be able to support a job seeker in identifying possible prospects and leads.

 

Here is an example / sample of a networking resume for reference..

 

If for some reason the above link does not translate accurately, it can also be located on the document section of my LinkedIn profile

 

Please let me know if you or someone you know might find this  beneficial next time they begin a job search.

 

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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Does your song make people turn up the volume or change the station?

Music has a way of influencing our mood and producing a reaction whether stimulating, soothing or simply sounds to suit the situation. While driving around if a song I like comes on the radio I tend to turn up the volume and may even start grooving to the beat. When a song is played that is not to my liking, I can’t wait to change the station.

There are some parallels between how we interpret music to how we process spoken and written words and other types of sensory stimuli as well. While all of us are multi dimensional with broad interests and talents, there are usually areas where our levels of attraction are higher or our performance is stronger.

Some individuals are brilliant with numbers and hard data. Others are outstanding at producing images and creative or artistic expressions through assorted mediums. Certain people are physically gifted with extraordinary athletic agility. Then there are those who might be considered a language lover or a word nerd.

In many cases those traits, characteristics and passions contribute to career selections, hobbies and interpersonal relations with others. Leveraging natural abilities and playing up strengths is much more comfortable than trying to force or shape ourselves into something that doesn’t make sense.

job hunting

job hunting (Photo credit: Robert S. Donovan)

For example, most things requiring physical coordination or athleticism cause me to struggle. Likewise, my mind seems to wander or stall when I encounter a situation where anything beyond basic mathematical proficiency is necessary.

During my younger years I enjoyed art and design and I still have an extreme appreciation for aesthetically pleasing environments and objects. Abstract concepts and unconventional ideas are also fascinating to me and I often find ways to organize divergent themes into purposeful patterns.

Attention to detail in various forms of communication has been part of the work that I’ve done throughout my career.  Whether writing content, presenting information or crafting a message on behalf of others, I take steps to absorb and acquire available and relevant inputs and then translate that to a logical output fit for the circumstances and audience. Even though the above sounds straight forward and I’ve gained substantial practice doing those activities, it still takes significant concentration and creativity to place the right parts into position.

That’s why I’m constantly baffled that people with far less experience producing targeted communications fail to comprehend those complexities and ultimately fail to execute effectively. Case in point, I’ve viewed countless resumes and online profiles and other career marketing collateral that quite frankly should have never been published.

The other day a job seeker handed me a full-color, heavy card stock, tri-fold pamphlet promoting their qualifications. Sounds impressive, right? Well it might have been had the entire piece not been visually cluttered, inconsistent and overloaded with redundant and extraneous detail.

The bigger problem with the document was the incoherent content including rambling sentences full of random capitalizations and other jarring formatting. There were also some peculiar word choices as if a thesaurus vomited all over the page without any regard for contextual relevance. For sure that person will be remembered, but I doubt that was the reaction they envisioned.

Another job seeker recently sent me two versions of their resume and two cover letters for alternate career paths. They claimed they had previously sought out professional help with those items, yet were not getting any response. Immediately, I could tell why.

Despite the fact that this person was highly educated with multiple advanced degrees and solid academic and professional credentials and experience, their materials were not at all a cohesive representation of their career stature. I certainly hope they haven’t already damaged their reputation by circulating those to their target employers.

One of their cover letters read like it was written by a high school dropout. It was entirely void of any sophistication that would be expected by a professional seeking a prominent, high-ranking position. Both resumes were far too busy and lengthy to keep my attention beyond a two second skim. I feel terrible knowing that person actually paid an alleged professional for that work product. All of it was a wasted effort and likely to cause them more harm than good.

As an active networker, I am constantly adding new contacts to my LinkedIn account. Naturally when I meet someone new or receive an invitation to connect, I review their profile. It continues to astound me how frequently I find blatant and glaring errors of all kinds on these profiles.

One marketing and advertising industry professional had two misspelled words in the first two lines of their profile. How confident is that supposed to make any prospective employers or clients feel about their abilities?

With as much awareness of how competitive the job market is, it is unacceptable for these scenarios to be so prevalent. Rather than making recipients say this is music to my ears and I feel like dancing, these materials end up resembling an annoying over played song that you can’t get out of your head.

Generally, I try to steer clear of dispensing job search advice on topics that seem obvious or those that should be common sense to everyone. However, I keep finding even the most basic premise “you only have one chance to make a first impression” is being missed in such a dramatic fashion.

When pursuing a new employment opportunity, there is no excuse for typos, misspellings, grammatical gaffes, punctuation problems, funky fonts, formatting and capitalization online or offline. Limited and repetitive vocabulary, incorrect word usage, improper verb tense or any other related flaws should never be displayed on anyone’s career marketing messages. All of these issues are correctable or preventable through proofreading.

People constantly ask me how they can be found, how they can stand out and how they can drive action in the midst of immense competition. There are plenty of techniques that can improve the chances of those things happening, but none of that matters if when found you stand out for the wrong reasons making people think you need to change your tune.

Did you spot the typos or mistakes in this article?  Please comment! 

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook, LinkedIn, GooglePlus and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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