Posts Tagged job seeker

Talent Topic Compilation 2013 Edition

It’s that time again to bid farewell to another year. Before we race in to the new year, here’s a rear view look at 25 of the talent topics touched upon in 2013. Please feel free to provide feedback and share your favorites with those in your network who might benefit. Wishing everyone a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

2013

2013

Wishing all good luck in the new year – praying mantis — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/may-2013-bring-mantis-like-mindfulness/

 Some of the worst job search advice EVER — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/follow-this-advice-to-knock-yourself-out-of-consideration-for-a-job/

Hidden reality of hidden jobs — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/are-the-jobs-hiding-from-you/

Job searching can be a crappy process, don’t make it worse — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/01/18/how-to-instantly-put-your-job-search-in-the-crapper/

Not all diversity looks like demographic diversity – http://www.ere.net/2013/01/22/talent-diversity-isnt-just-about-demographic-data/

Greatest job seeker gripes (about recruiters) — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/follow-up-flubs-fiascoes-and-failures-that-frustrate-candidates

Learning how stuff works is YOUR job — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/does-this-thing-come-with-an-instruction-manual

Not all unlucky numbers are bad — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/pondering-significance-circumstance-3-13-13/

Can you train a monkey to do your job?

http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/recap-of-this-week-s-rbc-lessons-don-t-monkey-around-with-lies

Maybe it’s April Fool’s Day everyday for job candidates — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/fooling-around-with-candidates-everyday

Who decided that 80% of jobs are not posted? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/who-is-hiding-all-of-the-jobs

What happens when clueless people become recruiters? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/sucky-slacker-sourcing-strategies

Companies say they want to hire for certain traits, yet end up selecting something else —  http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/hypocrisy-in-hiring

Overly restrictive job requirements — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/is-there-any-responsibility-to-educate-or-enlighten-your-hiring

Recruiters that are crazy, lazy, or both — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/these-recruiters-must-be-crazy-to-be-so-lazy

Job search version of 20 questions — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/08/02/20-questions-for-your-job-search/

Age old issue of old age (and discrimination) — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/admit-it-the-big-o-stimulates-quite-a-reaction

Shedding light on the stigma of job hopping — http://wthomsonjr.com/guest-blog–kelly-blokdijk/maybe-you-should-withhold-that-job-hopper-judgment/

#1 reason for resume rejection — https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2013/08/07/20-questions-for-your-job-search-2/

Opposite of good employer branding — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/how-to-cement-your-reputation-as-a-dorkola-recruiter

No need to settle for terrible HR — http://www.tlnt.com/2013/09/04/why-do-we-settle-for-low-information-human-resources/

Is it necessary information or an interview question? — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/are-you-sure-you-need-the-answer-to-that-question

We all know what they say about assumptions — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/stop-showing-candidates-your-a-s-s-umptions

Everyone believes they know how to pick the best person for the job

http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/the-best-person-for-the-job

Caring enough to cook up creative content — http://www.recruitingblogs.com/profiles/blogs/refried-beans-and-recruiting-blogs

 Talent Topic Compilation Edition 2013 Articles by Kelly Blokdijk http://linkedin.com/in/kellyblokdijkattalenttalks

Kelly Blokdijk on Twitter @TalentTalks

Publication sources include:

TalentTalks Talent Optimization Blog https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/

Recruiting Blogs Dot Com http://recruitingblogs.com

TLNT Dot Com http://tlnt.com

Electronic Recruiting Exchange – ERE Dot Net http://www.ere.net

Bulls Eye Recruiting via http://wthomsonjr.com/

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Does your resume overwhelm your networking connections with TMI?

Often when a person embarks on a new job search, one of the first activities they do is update their resume and start passing it out to anyone and everyone they’ve ever met. While that might sound like a fine way to get things moving quickly, it tends to send the wrong message and ends up being a complicated, confusing and burdensome set of data for other people to process in their attempt to offer assistance.

 

Much of the content typically included on a traditional resume used to apply for jobs, could potentially distract a professional or personal networking contact from truly understanding the core job search elements that a job seeker needs to share.  It’s simply too much information (TMI)!

 

Most likely, the other person will not be in a position to have the proper context of the job seeker’s professional history, capabilities and differentiating factors, in relation to the current employment market or their desired career goals. Using a “networking resume” is one way to eliminate that issue.

 

A networking resume’s purpose is to provide a high-level overview of the key competencies and value added contributions a person delivers within their occupation. It may also cover education level, professional credentials obtained and prior employers, without the specific details of dates or titles… just enough to give readers an idea of what they’ve achieved.

 

Another feature of a networking resume is a section to highlight examples of target companies and / or the type of industry focus a person may have for their future role. Keeping the entire “story” to one page is an excellent way to help others be able to support a job seeker in identifying possible prospects and leads.

 

Here is an example / sample of a networking resume for reference..

 

If for some reason the above link does not translate accurately, it can also be located on the document section of my LinkedIn profile

 

Please let me know if you or someone you know might find this  beneficial next time they begin a job search.

 

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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How to build a BAD brand

Maybe I read too much, but for the past several years there seems to be a completely out of control and growing obsession with personal branding. There are even generational gurus and mavens dedicating entire websites, blogs and books, along with countless citations in mass media publications on branding from A to Z for the X, Y, Z and beyond generation.

Regardless of the intended audience, most of the content is generic, repetitive and redundant. Yet based on the incessant flow of these materials one gets the impression that there is an insatiable demand for more of the same. For obvious reasons, many people are fed up with the silly buzzwords and superficial ideas being passed off as expertise on this logic-defying topic.

Branding balls: listen and learn from legendary musician, Lemmy
Branding balls! Listen and learn from legendary musician, Lemmy

Some of the advice seems to imply that the signs of someone who is well branded are a myname.com web domain, a logo or an icon, a catch-phrase and color scheme on a business card showing what that brand represents. And, of course the ultimate evidence of a true branding strategy is influence through blogs and social media activity.

The worst branding message I‘ve repeatedly encountered is the recommendation to “brand yourself as an expert.” Huh?

Another gem I’ve seen is “how to create your personality on LinkedIn” which is rather interesting because most people consider that a professional networking site, not a place where personalities are created. As if that is even possible!

Coming from the experts all of this sounds pretty swell though, right? Sure, if you are marketing a running shoe, carbonated beverage or automobile.

But, what if you are Fred in accounting? Not quite the same situation! No one wants to hear you spew out a pithy pivot table pitch or read your blog on balance sheets. If you really are the guru of GAAP. Just do what you do. Accurately and consistently. Your brand will take care of itself.

The sources of this concept attempt to give the impression that one can just whip up a brand out of thin air and act as if it reflects reality. I’ve even seen suggestions for people to model their brand after someone else they admire for being a success in their midst.

That particular idea makes me think of a bride tearing photos out of fashion magazines as inspiration before going shopping for her wedding dress. Or, maybe a person who visits luxurious model homes to get decorating ideas to mimic in their own home improvement projects. And, of course there is the example of a trendy celebrity hairstyle becoming a phenomenon amongst regular people.

Couture, carpeting and coifs are easy enough to imitate or duplicate, but borrowing a branding idea from one person and applying it to another seems rather suspicious and frankly a bit stalker-ish, if not entirely pathetic. Not to mention the absurdity of trying to fabricate a new persona as if starting over fresh under the witness protection program.

The obvious problem with all of this is that a person’s brand is essentially their reputation. Meaning it already exists in some form or another. It is reflected in how others perceive that person from the context of what they see, hear, observe and know from personal experience with that person, whether through tangible evidence or intangible gut feelings. There is no way a person can magically make that image vanish and replace it with their chosen brand of expertise.

Most people have enough instinct to sense when someone is trying to portray something that is less than authentic. And, more importantly, the people we tend to admire, respect and recommend for whatever reason usually have a level of credibility built from actual talent, expertise or personality that can’t be easily replicated.

True experts, geniuses or brilliant innovators don’t go around telling everyone that’s what they are, because they don’t need to. It just shows.

A prime example is legendary rocker, Lemmy. As the founder of Motorhead and a constant fixture in the LA rock-n-roll scene, he has been an influential force in practically every genre of music that mattered since the 60s.

There is absolutely no chance Lemmy ever gave a single thought to impressing anyone through wardrobe, grooming, playing style or stage presence other than to show up and do his thing. He has never shown any sign of an interest in “branding himself” or “creating his brand” yet he endures like only a few others from his era.

In the documentary film Lemmy, there is an endless parade of industry insiders and fellow rock stars praising Lemmy’s ability to transcend generations and musical tastes. If you haven’t seen the film, check out Jon Konrath’s overview.

Lemmy is the real deal and he has no need to prove his expertise or tell anyone he is an expert, because it is just obvious. Here is guy quoted as saying he remembers what it was like before rock-n-roll and he has managed to remain relevant in a highly competitive environment, by simply being who and what he is… Badass!

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal positioning campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on LinkedIn, GooglePlus, Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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Armed with career strengthening strategies

For many of the early years of my career I worked in a very physically demanding environment. Often I joked that going to the gym, exercising or working out was completely unnecessary because my job provided up to eight hours of that each shift.

Being so active and performing physical work was tiring and hard on the body, but also provided the benefit of a built in fitness regime. One of the side-effects from my work was a very muscular physique.

Image

People regularly asked me if I was a body-builder, weight-lifter or some other type of fitness fanatic. No matter what, I always got strange reactions and looks of disbelief when I informed them that I didn’t do any of those things. No one seemed willing to buy that my “buff arms” were simply a result of my job.

Sometimes, it was actually a source of embarrassment that prompted me to wear longer sleeves to avoid the looks and comments. It got to the point that even after I no longer did that type of work, my self-consciousness made me reluctant to do too much activity that would stimulate muscle growth in my arms.

Perhaps, I took it for granted that those muscles would stay firm without any further conditioning. Unfortunately, that approach backfired and my lack of strengthening, combined with age and typical female genetics resulted in increasingly squishy upper arms.

No one likes the look or feel of flabby body parts. But when exposed, arms in particular have a way of waving their flaps around for all to see. I sure wish I could exchange the visible mushy mess with the muscle I once tried to hide.

That reaction is very similar to when people get complacent in their careers and suddenly realize their previously comfortable situation is gone and they don’t know how to get it back. The new normal is anything but predictable and what we once took for granted in the way of structure, stability and strength may never exist again.

Professionals must stay vigilant in conditioning themselves for the future. Just like our muscles get soft from lack of use, our knowledge, skills and abilities can quickly become obsolete if we don’t take action to step up our learning regimen.

None of us have a crystal ball or psychic powers to preview what lies ahead, but that doesn’t mean we can’t take control of what we do know. We must continue exercising our brains, building our talent and creating a resilient mind-set to buffer ourselves from the challenges and obstacles we can’t specifically predict, but sure can expect.

What steps are you taking to buff up your career?

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook, LinkedIn, GooglePlus and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

 

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Talent Topic Compilation 2011 Edition

Perhaps like me you struggle to keep up with the mass quantities of information that flows your way each day. Here, I’ve compiled many of the job search, career management, employment market, recruiting and networking articles I’ve posted throughout the year.

The header before the link gives a general idea of the content and the blurb below the link shows an excerpt from the article itself. Please do share feedback by commenting directly on the source site or via private message back to me.

Why job search basics matter most

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/12/13/forget-fancy-focus-on-the-fundamentals-in-your-job-search/

The most obvious sign of a person who naively follows rudimentary job search advice is that their resume, LinkedIn profile, business bio or verbal introduction looks, reads and sounds like everyone else’s.

Problems with interviews and interviewers

http://community.ere.net/blogs/kellyblokdijk/2011/10/using-flawed-criteria-to-select-candidates/

Savvy job seekers are skilled at navigating interview questions and formulating appropriate replies to tell the interviewer what they think they want to hear.

Performing the job before you get the job

http://community.ere.net/blogs/kellyblokdijk/2011/09/is-it-is-fair-to-ask-candidates-to-work-for-work/

In the past, I’ve been asked to provide work samples and actually found that preferable to enduring round after round of “tell me about a time when…” behavioral questions.

Recognizing the difference between good and bad job search advice

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/09/23/job-seekers-should-never-pay-for-resume-writing-or-job-search-coaching/

Most, if not all, providers of career services assistance offer free initial consultations. There is no reason not to take advantage of those being generous with their time and who actually have the specialized knowledge to help those who need it most.

Unconventional top talent might rock your socks off

http://community.ere.net/blogs/kellyblokdijk/2011/09/rock-out-your-talent-strategy-with-a-yellow-guitar/

I can’t help myself, it just happens – whether eating a cheeseburger, folding laundry or watching embarrassing reality shows, I somehow find a way to yank a talent management or talent acquisition issue out of practically everything.

More of the best and worst job search advice

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/09/03/don%e2%80%99t-succumb-to-the-job-search-cluster-funk/

In honor of Labor Day, I encourage job seekers to avoid treating their professional future like a disposable kitchen sponge. Take ownership of your progress. Be discerning in vetting advice or advisors and don’t succumb to the cluster funk.

Don’t be a LinkedIn loser

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/07/06/10-most-popular-pesky-linkedin-pet-peeves/

While almost everyone is aware of the need to create a positive first impression, here are a few of the most common issues observed where that may not be happening.

Not as simple as it could be to apply for a job

http://community.ere.net/blogs/kellyblokdijk/2011/05/how-many-more-hoops-before-i-can-apply-now/

Are the companies that do this really hiring the best talent or are they merely finding those with enough time and patience to hop through hoop after hoop?

Too much information for your resume

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/04/30/respect-the-urge-and-resist-the-cheesecake/

While composing their customized messages, job seekers should consider their audience and just point out the critical pieces and ingredients related to their target position

Employee referrals

http://www.ere.net/2011/04/20/tell-em-to-apply-online/

With limited resources and an interest in finding the right cultural and skill fit, employers often rely on employee referral programs to incentivize current workers to help them acquire new talent.

Poor treatment of job candidates

http://www.ere.net/2011/04/12/talent-acquisition-steps-that-enrage-not-engage-top-talent/

Perhaps these employers feel that they have nothing to lose with their lack of compassion and disregard for those expressing interest in joining their firms.

Dealing with job search rejection

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/04/05/impersonal-hiring-practices-means-not-taking-rejection-personally/

Being that unemployment has reached and remained at historically high levels, it is possible that employers interpret that to mean there is no reason to show compassion and courtesy to those expressing interest in joining their companies.

Professional networking and industry connections

http://community.ere.net/blogs/kellyblokdijk/2011/02/professional-courtesy-vs-swatting-mosquitoes/

My underlying feeling was that if a couple minutes of my time might help someone accomplish something that otherwise may not have occurred, why not lend a hand? And, I’ve been around long enough to have experienced several random outcomes from chance encounters to keep an open mind about helping out in this way.

Making a great first impression

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/pay-attention-to-the-most-important-figure-in-your-job-search-strategy/

Regarding first impressions, whether being found in person, online or on paper, you must have your act together. That means your physical and tangible appearance as well as any virtual representations of you must all reflect the image you wish to portray.

Now hiring “A” players only please

https://talenttalks.wordpress.com/2011/01/25/five-hints-to-tell-if-you-are-considered-a-level-talent%e2%80%a6/

Top talent is always in demand regardless of state of the job market. Make sure you understand what that means to those who decide who they plan to call when the time comes.

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn – fans and followers welcome!

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Forget fancy, focus on the fundamentals in your job search

If you’ve ever conducted a job search, no doubt you’ve encountered plenty of information that looked or sounded super slick. There’s a ton of advice on the topic and each day more and more experts pop up to share their version of the latest and greatest way to find a job. It all sounds fantastic, fun and fancy until you realize much of it is just a bunch of fluff.

When interacting with job seekers, I almost always spot the ones who have a tendency to go to extremes. On one side, you have the people who meander their way around, never really giving their job search their full attention or taking it as seriously as they say they do. At the other end of the spectrum are the people who latch on to every single piece of advice as if doing so will magically produce multiple dream job offers. Unfortunately, neither type of job seeker really makes the right kind of progress.

Even if you are an exceptional performer in your field, that doesn’t mean you are an expert in preparing an effective campaign related to pursuing a new opportunity. Sometimes, it makes sense to outsource things beyond your ability to someone with more specialized knowledge. It’s far less painful to seek legitimate help than to embarrass yourself through trial and error or getting caught up in habits that hurt your image.

The people who do “get it” usually skip the shiny shenanigans and buckle down for the old-fashioned basics. Here are few job search concepts that I try to help people keep in mind regardless of their career level.

Tip 1: Take the process seriously and allocate proper time, effort, energy and financial resource investments accordingly

There are no short-cuts, nor should you short-change yourself by expecting something for nothing. Getting the basics right from the start will make the job search process much more tolerable and productive. For example, despite countless catchy articles proclaiming the “death of the resume” they are still the most widely accepted and expected tool to convey information to prospective employers. Having a relevant, concisely written, error-free, achievement-focused resume is crucial to communicate one’s professional credibility and credentials.

Tip 2: Research, assess and understand your target audience and adapt your strategy, approach and customized communications (online, on paper & in person) to create the best possible impression

The most obvious sign of a person who naively follows rudimentary job search advice is that their resume, LinkedIn profile, business bio or verbal introduction looks, reads and sounds like everyone else’s. Stale, cliché phrases and repetitive, redundant vocabulary is evident from the first syllable and generously deposited throughout their career marketing communications, making the recipient feel as if they’ve seen the same message over and over. That’s because they probably have already viewed plenty of professional positioning statements describing a results-oriented, team-player with a successful track-record of expertise as a seasoned professional with 17+ years experience as an experienced, expert superstar professional. Trust me, unless you are trying to convey blah, bland and boring, your content needs to compelling and pertinent to get and keep someone’s attention.

Tip 3: Scrutinize each and every available source of information, search technique and piece of advice to ensure it makes sense for your unique situation versus following generic practices that might cause more harm than good

When I have more in depth conversations with people, they often share with me what they’ve been doing, what ideas they’ve tried and what they think is or isn’t working. Right away, it is evident when someone has been steered down the wrong path for their specific needs. They often react to my guidance and clarification with “wow, I hadn’t thought of that” or “that is a great idea and it makes perfect sense” or “thanks for letting me know how that might work against me, I won’t let that happen again.”

If you or someone you know is struggling in your job search, think about whether making some changes might help. Many job search service providers offer no cost, no pressure, no obligation initial consultations to prospective clients and those researching various support options. Put those external resources to use and learn how to decode the right blend of intelligent job search methodology for your unique circumstances.

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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Don’t succumb to the job search cluster funk

It constantly amazes me that there seems to be a growing and never-ending supply of experts touting their version of job search expertise all across the planet. Apparently, anyone who has ever had a job, applied for a job or even heard the word job is now well qualified to sport the label of career expert. A funky phenomenon that expands exponentially as the great recession drags on…

Clearly, it makes no difference whether any of these freshly, self-appointed experts bring any true, experience-based awareness about their subject matter of choice. Rather, the important thing is that they are – according to their misplaced intentions – paying it forward and giving back by offering to help anyone they encounter with their brand of enlightenment. Their method and message is inconsequential, as long as enough people can be convinced to focus any amount of attention on them and their brilliant ideas about how others should go about finding employment.

As I conduct ongoing research related to assorted topics in the employment arena, I can’t seem to escape the constant barrage of nonsense being portrayed as legitimate and credible information and advice. Evidently there is a huge appetite amongst job seekers for this peculiar blend of outdated, ineffective, misleading and absurd information. Much of it is recycled from decades past by out of touch individuals who haven’t bothered to stay current in how things have evolved over the years. Some people even seem to have a cult-like obsession over certain programs and providers of this content, regardless of inaccuracy or missing connection to modern, real-world scenarios.

My point is not to suggest that there isn’t valuable information to be found, or actual experts offering useful guidance. The issue is there seems to be far more faux experts than those who actually provide appropriate direction to those in need. From my observations and frequent interactions with job seekers, the average person doesn’t necessarily have the insight needed to decipher what fits their situation.

Just recently, I attended a career-related presentation that was so indescribable. First of all, the main reason I went was due to my perverse curiosity after seeing the completely incoherent promotional ad for the event. As atrocious as that was, it didn’t even come close to the actual delivery, tone and approach during the hour and half session. Despite cringing and squirming in my seat, I endured the painful fiasco in the name of market research.

Having previously attended similar presentations that were equally dreadful, it was practically impossible to feign interest. The only way that I can think of to define the experience was that in the midst of my agony I jotted down the term: CF. Yes, it was that bad! Thus, that incident instantly became the inspiration for the sanitized version of this article’s title.

The worst part of the above is knowing that people are unknowingly being harmed by their eagerness to find a fast and easy solution. Most of them want to take the quickest route to end their job search, yet they do the opposite by absorbing and drowning in buckets of sludge.

The analogy that comes to mind is a shriveled up sponge being dropped into a sink full of dirty dishes that have been left covered in crusty, gooey morsels of food scraps. As the globs of gunk make their way onto the sponge, it plumps back up almost looking normal. But alas, it’s just full of garbage.

In honor of Labor Day, I encourage job seekers to avoid treating their professional future like a disposable kitchen sponge. Take ownership of your progress. Be discerning in vetting advice or advisors and don’t succumb to the cluster funk.

Article by Kelly Blokdijk ~ As a Talent Optimization Coach & Consultant with TalentTalks, Kelly thrives on “Creating a Voice for Talent” by partnering with business professionals and job seekers to build competitive career marketing strategies, customized communication materials and compelling personal branding campaigns to create a lasting positive impression. TalentTalks consults with the business community on innovative, leading-edge human resource and organization development initiatives to enhance talent management, talent acquisition, corporate communications and employee engagement programs. TalentTalks routinely posts employment market and job search related content on Facebook and Twitter – fans and followers welcome!

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